Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Easy High Key Portrait Technique

11 comments:

Connie Fore said...

Scott, excellent video!!!! Don't stop with the videos because you are making me more money with my pet photography business. I love adding that extra special touch to my photos and so do my clients. Keep the videos coming my friend!!!!!

nicole said...

I think it is awsome how you come up with these short cuts. Im new to photography and using lights and photoshop and i think it is great you help us newbies with these short cuts. I always look forward to your videos.

Austen said...

I agree with the original Anonymous...You **could** do it right the first time and save yourself extra hassle, but then again, not all of us have a full studio of lighting equipment, not all of us are as skilful as professional portrait photographers, and some of us make mistakes !!

So, that begs the question, if Anonymous is so good, why does he read Scotts blogs ??

Many thanks, Scott, I certainly appreciate your effort !

Austen.

Sandy@memories42morrow said...

Scott,
Thanks for the excellent info and for going the extra mile to help us out. The videos have helped me so much. Reading the elements manual and figuring it out is so time consuming. You not only provide excellent products but the customer service and support that follows is priceless!
Keep up the great work!

Anonymous said...

[qoute]I agree with the original Anonymous...You **could** do it right the first time and save yourself extra hassle, but then again, not all of us have a full studio of lighting equipment, not all of us are as skilful as professional portrait photographers, and some of us make mistakes !!

So, that begs the question, if Anonymous is so good, why does he read Scotts blogs ??

Many thanks, Scott, I certainly appreciate your effort !

Austen.[/quote]
Austen Im aware that not all people have a full studio, but the point is that you dont need a full studio for this type of shot, a window a small flash and awhite BG is all you need, As to why I read the blog well i read many blogs about this and that I dont think having an opinion on a giving photo should exclude me from reading a blog, all im saying is that if you learn to do it right there will be no need of the PS tip that has been shown, but i do wonder if this tip would work on a more detailed highkey shot than the sample shown

3kids1cat said...

I tried this with a few of my shots and I wonder what % opacity did you use? I found I had to be much more precise than you did when I was doing the "high key" tutorial....

Anonymous said...

how do you deal with babies and kids that have hair and the background can be seen through the hair? When I did it I couldn't keep the line clean....can you let us know which brush you use?

Brad W. Smith said...

As a professional, today we all know it is 50% image capture and 50% post. I have been doing it right for many years, and back when it was all film, the post in the darkroom was always about the same, 50/50. What is important is to learn how to do both, learn the proper ways to shoot, light, pose, art direct, work flows, post and finish. Tips and tricks are how we go from good images to great images, every time.

Vani said...

I stumbled on this website, and I appreciate the info you have given away for free. I don't agree with anonymous's comment that you could just get high key with a small flash and some white backdrop with window light. Has this person really shot white hi key and has example with his setup? that would be interesting. Unless you are shooting on bright day overexposing the backgroud, you couldn't do it. And that means you cannot control the time of the day. I've been shooting studio hi key. (I have still not perfected). I am concerned with some floor shadows.

In my set up, there are 2 AB's 800 on a white seamless paper, an AB 800 as main with large softbox or umbrella, another fill light. Still it is hard to get the background uneven, I am experimenting with modifiers on backdrop lights, adding another light for long shot (for baby it is fine).

Yes, you NEED equipment to get hikey right out of the camera. Especially if you are doing floor length shots. You could not do this with one small flash light.

By the way, having a white backdrop does not make the backdrop white. You need to light it. Evenly that is. Subject needs to 8ft atleast in front of backdrop, so there is not reflectance. I shoot backdrop f/11and main f/8. Dont' overexpose backdrop, as the image looks foggy, and loses the contrast.

Thanks for the tips.

Vani said...

I mean it is still hard to get backdrop evenly lit.

write a university paper said...

Really so, I hardly can make it